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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the world, larry holmes, and jim gray, from my money, the best by who ever covered boxing ever. so two champs with us. larry, to you first, i said you were the rodney dangerfield of boxing, you came after muhammad ali but the fact is that you stayed on longer as champ. only joe lewis, held that title longer, and you fought everyone, you done dodge anybody. -- you didn't dodge anybody, looking back at ali and clay ha he did then, highway he changed box -- how he changes boxing then, what do you snj. >> he did a great job. he was the martin luther king of boxy, giving opportunities and pride. as far as sonny liston, you know, i was a ali fan, all the way, i think what he did was fantastic. because i was young, i was rooting and rooting for muhammad ali. so, you know he could do no wrong in my book. neil: you were a training partner of his in. >> yes, i spaared with ali for 4 1/2 years, and he beat me up a few times, i got even with him at the end. neil: you did. >> i beat him up. neil: you did. jim gray. >> without anger. neil: jim, your contribution, someone who watched this, and analyz
for us here at cnn, jim sciutto. jim, what are your sources telling you tonight? i think we've got to emphasize, the white house hasn't said much about this and nobody expected the president of the united states to come out and make a statement about the ukraine. >> well, the white house hasn't said much but they were certainly worried about it and i've been hearing from a number of different parts of the government as their anxiety grew over the last 24 and 48 hours that something like this would happen. we've all seen the public statements from u.s. officials, from secretary kerry, secretary hagel warning russia not to do exactly what appears to have happened now in the ukraine and that is, send russian troops in. u.s. officials believe these are russia troops. over time, they are getting a better handle and the extent of the troops. this is a scenario that some had warned me about. the idea of tran it would be something more sought tell, special ops and black ops to get more cover and you see the russians getting legal cover here. the ambassador to the u.n. saying that the movem
of war, it affects how and when every american finally comes home. our pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski is again traveling with the chairman of the joint chiefs in afghanistan. he joins us by satellite from bagram air base. jim, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. u.s. and nato leaders were already scheduled to meet tomorrow in brussels, to talk about the way ahead in afghanistan. instead they may be looking for the way out. joint chiefs chairman general martin dempsey was about to land in afghanistan tonight when he got the word. start preparing to pull all u.s. troops out of afghanistan by the end of the year. >> we are at a point where we have to begin planning for other options. >> reporter: in a phone call today, president obama urged afghan president to sign a bilateral security agreement that would protect any american troops who remain in afghanistan once the war is officially over at the start of next year. karzai once more refused. white house press secretary jay carney said the president immediately ordered plans for a total u.s. withdrawal. >> this i
an act of aggression against ukraine. what's happening now and what does it all mean? nbc's jim maceda is in moscow. bill neely is in crimea. jim, we start with you in the russian capital there. what does that approval of putin's request to use russian troops mean? >> reporter: hi, craig. you're right. it is pretty symbolic. the legislative body that putin requested that use of force from is a rubber stamp, upper house of parliament. and it doesn't mean that putin will now send in more troops into crimea. there are thousands there already all part of russia's black sea fleet. large numbers have been seen there over the past 48 hours, securing airports, government buildings, telecom towers. what the approval does mean is it's official now. russians have been mobilized in crimea. they can now all put their patches back on. and the approval of course gives putin more options. it allows him to strike not only crimea but anywhere in ukraine. and of course that spikes the tension even higher. >> jim, any word at this point on a timetable? >> reporter: not that we're aware of, no. but i can t
. abc's senior national correspondent jim avila with the headline tonight. >> the gw bridge is totally gridlocked. >> stay out of the center of town. >> reporter: 911 tapes released today takes us inside the chaos that was fort lee, new jersey. when top aides of the governor jammed the world's busiest bridge. >> you are aware the town is total gridlock. >> reporter: warning first responders firefighters, police, it is not a normal day within fort lee. >> we're getting calls from irate motorists. >> reporter: the four days from september 9 through 12, now forever known as fort lee's traffic armageddon and chris christie bridgegate. despite that noise, governor chris christie insists he was kept in the dark. one of the influential counties wailing about unbearable traffic, in the middle of his re-election campaign. he insists that he didn't know about those medical emergencies on hold. >> paramedics were notified. she has a head injury. >> you know, it's an emergency and they are not still here. >> they're coming. okay, they're on the way. >> reporter: that's christie palling around with
a russian military base there, as well as ethnic russians living in the region. let's go to nbc's jim maceda with the very latest on this. jim, let's get the latest. are we seeing something that could be another cold war brewing here between the u.s. and russia, ultimately? >> reporter: alex, well, the first sign things were going seriously south today was this morning when russian foreign minister sergei lavrov said that ukrainian power militaries actually attacked the ministry in crimea, wounding several people, presumably ethnic russians. despite there being no confirmation, no evidence of that, that alleged threat to russian compatriots in ukraine triggered a quick escalation, which russia has used many times before to justify an invasion. first the leader of ethnic russians in crimea called on president putin to send forces in to protect them from hostile extremists. then very quickly putin replied, requesting the use of force. and as you said in your lead, getting that request from force from the parliament. all that happening within just hours. now, that doesn't mean, alex, that putin
approved that use of force. on the phone, we have chief national security correspondent jim sciutto. jim, what is this very quick vote signal to you? >> reporter: i think it's the russians slow rolling an invasion of sovereign ukrainian territory, and in direct defiance of repeated public and stern warnings from u.s. officials ranging from secretary kerry, secretary hagel right up to the top, right up to the president. you saw his comments yesterday. it is a sobering development. the fact is, u.s. officials were already telling us yesterday that those masked troops on the ground as of yesterday in and around crimea were russian so now you have a public in effect acknowledgment from the russian government that the president wants to send troops in there, this authorization. i think the other point is that you can see this as an intelligence failure by the u.s. officials had been telling us in the last 48, 72 hours that it was their assessment that the russians would not go in, and here you have it happening. it is not the way they did it in georgia in 2008. you remember when russia sent t
. craig? >> all right. nbc's ian williams for us there in ukraine, thank you. want to bring in nbc's jim mecada now. we heard from secretary of state kerry and samantha power and then the white house announcement on friday afternoon that warning that there would be costs. how's russia reacting to the criticism coming from this country? >> reporter: well, if russia is putin, they're reacting like the teflon man. first of all, the reason for that is that putin wouldn't call what he's doing an act of war or aggression with all due respect to secretary of state kerry, but more of an act of self defense from his point of view, from putin's point of view, the new western or pro-western government in kiev is posing an existential threat to crimea and it's an essential war mortar port and base for the black sea fleet and he doesn't seem a bit affect bd i the criticism from abroad. putin doesn't seem to -- he doesn't seem to believe that the u.s. or its allies have the leverage to hurt him, especially when he sees the kind of reaction coming from russians out in the streets here in moscow and st.
could make russia a pariah, would vladimir putin bat an eyelash? joining me from moscow, nbc's jim maceda. jim, how is putin reacting to this criticism? >> reporter: hi there. well, karen, first of all, putin wouldn't call what he's doing an act of war or aggression, with all due respect to secretary of state kerry. as putin told german chancellor angela merkel in a phone call this evening, he believes mos w moscow's actions are appropriate, and they're more about self-defense. from his point of view, the new pro-western government in kiev poses a threat to his interest in ukraine. that's primarily crimea, where today there were even more troops roaming around going from ukraine army or military post to post, as you mentioned in your lead, trying to disarm the ukrainians. when they wouldn't agree to that, surrounding them and neutralizing their bases. but crimea gives putin the essentials he wants and needs. a base for his black sea fleet. he just doesn't seem affected by all the criticism coming from abroad. putin doesn't seem to believe that the u.s. or its allies have the kind
accusations this was going to bring back jim crowe. i looked through the jim crowe laws of the deep south where i grew up. i couldn't find anything common to that at all in this bill. it was very minor language changes. can you help our audience understand exactly what did this bill do? >> senate bill 1062 clarified an updated arizona religious freedom restoration act as we saw courts around the country basically saying that the government wasn't a party to the lawsuit, then the religious freedom restoration act would not apply. that was the main clarification. an individual or a business could assert their religious freedom rights, whether or not the government was a party to the lawsuit so it would b intended to help the little sisters of the poor, the photographer, the wedding cake maker, hobby lobby, those businesses where the government is trying to force them to forego their religious beliefs. >> it was not discriminatory but for example if i owned a jewish dell ka teten and someone said i want you to do bacon wrapped shrimp, then i would be protected because the government wouldn't
jim s crow. i lived through the jim crow d laws ofan the deep south where grew up. i couldn't find anything common to that at all in this bill. it was very minor language changes. so can you help our audience understand exactly what did thi bill do? >> senate bill 1062 simply clarified and updated arizona's religious freedom restoration act as we saw courts around thep country basically saying that the government, if the government wasn't a party to the lawsuit, then the religious freedom restoration act wouldn't apply. an individual or businessicate assert their religious freedom rights whether the government was a party to the lawsuit so it would help the little sisters oa the poor, the photographer, the wedding cake baker, those typesf of businesses where the government is trying to force them to forego their religious believes. >> it was not discriminatory, but if i was the owner of a j jewish delicatessen and was kosher and someone came in and said i want you to do my wedding and i want bacon wrapped shrimp andgo i said i didn't want to d that, i would be protected because the
: chicago jim teacher wore number 7, a wide receiver, his freshman year? three operations to repair stress fractures in both legs with titanium rods. now he can't even jog. >> is there every a day you can't feel pain? >> every day i wake up i feel pain, with the rods. i do feel pain. i do feel the guys with ncaa. they should take the rods out. >> reporter: lifetime coverage for sports injuries is one of the goals for current northwestern players who are asking the national labor board to recognize them as a labor union. the players argue they're already full-time players who should have scholarships and rules. it is the boldest assault yet on the ncaa and it is fiercely defending the image of amateur student athletes. their leader? graduating quarterback cane coulter. >> it is almost like a dick dictatorship, where nothing is decided by us. >> reporter: on the sidelines, paid endorsements, and scholarships. >> frankly, money is what this is all about. how do you divide all the money that is made from the big-time sports. >> reporter: division one sports generated an estimated 7 billion the
joining me now from moscow is nbc's jim maceda. jim, with a good evening to you. a lot of diplomatic salvos being tossed back and forth here. but what's happening on the ground in crimea? >> reporter: hi, alex. you're right. it's hard to keep up with them all. tonight, crimea looking pretty much neutralized. russian forces have now been moving freely around the peninsula for a couple of days because they are mostly off the streets. they and the armed vigilante groups, if you will, are in control. airport, the telecommunication towers. today as you alerted, units of russian troopser driving to various ukrainian military posts trying to persuade the ukrainian soldiers to hand over their weapons. and then surrounding the posts of those who refuse to disarm. just taking them out of operation. so despite all of the appeals that we're hearing from the united states, from kiev. from the west in general, those diplomatic salvos, as you call them, to put his forces, putin's forces back, to pull them back, crimea today effectively is in vladimir putin's hands, alex. >> okay. so, jim, the new u
. even before that, jim engineers were concerned about potential fatalities from
jim sciutto is here. let's cut through the noise, the politics and spin. what are we talking about in terms of cuts to the military? break it down. >> reporter: you look at the numbers. the current budget is basically halfway between what the pentagon wanted and the more draconian cuts that came during sequestration. the real headline number is reducing the size of the army from a peak during those two wars in afghanistan and iraq from 570,000 to 450,000. cutting the wart hog designed to attack soviet tanks, also cutting benefits such as housing allowances for soldiers, subsidies to stores on military bases. some of these are politically sensitive things. but as always the military is trying to make a balance of priorities with the numbers that they've been given. >> so in terms of the cuts, obviously the things like housing allowance, that's going to affect the livelihood, the lifestyle of soldiers which is obviously an incredibly important thing and marines and sailors and others. in terms of the danger, could these cuts endanger americans both at home and abroad? is there truth
have been disbanded. >> reporter: i'm jim wilcox live on independence square where later potential cabinet ministers are expected to be paraded before the crowds. >>> violence as the prime minister resists calls for his resignation after what he says are fake audio recordings. >>> what are these fossilized remains of whales doing in a south american desert? >>> hello everyone. let me take you first to the chinese capital beijing today. there it is, you can't see much. that's because the smog hanging over the city is the thickest ever, so thick that it's literally off the scale. it's now so bad that hundreds of thousands of people are fearful of doing this, of leaving their homes. that's because of the i'm pafkt of breathing the air on their health. this latest pollution has already lasted a week. so how bad is it? well, to the irritation of the chinese government, the u.s. embassy in beijing is tracking air quality from its building with gradings from good, green air, to hazardous at the bottom. this is the embassy website of daily data, the current reading is right up beyond hazar
congressman jim mcdermott of washington. first elected in 1989, he's a member of the progressive caucus. he was a leading voice on health care. this was before obamacare, it was when the clinton administration was trying to reform health care. in april 1993, he had a big meeting scheduled at the white house with then first lady hillary clinton. the goal was to get congressman mcdermott on board with the clinton administration's approach to health reform as they tried to get it passed through congress. the day before that meeting, hillary clinton's staff, we now know, sent her this memo prepping her for that meeting with congressman mcdermott, quote, we need to keep him happy and on our side. quote, as staged and presumptuous as that is, you might suggest you throw out all the staff at the end of the meeting to have a private meeting with him. this will signal to him your closeness with him. it's like reading the stage directions on "house of cards" or west wing," less murders. the efforts by the clinton white house to woo certain members of congress are kind of fascinating to read about in
this, but i believe jim mcgrechy appointed mr. samson to an important role at some point. >> david samson has friends on both sides of the aisle. that's certainly a part of the story. >> jim mcgreevey is a bipartisan sort of a guy. that said -- >> not the paragon of ethics in new jersey. >> i don't remember him being investigated by a legislative committee, though. come back to this idea of an ethical problem, this presents what we in the legislature like to call a marcy hochman moment, our legislative council. you do not do anything that even remotely ben you. if we're a part-time legislator, and we are, we cannot vote on a bill that will directly benefit one of our clients. i'm not going to comment on the particulars of those cases because i don't see all the facts, but until such time -- it just strikes me that, again, when you're in that position, your law firm is that closely related to it, there are certainly questions that need to be addressed. i'm sure that he will address them. >> given what had his law firm does and what the port authority does, there's the overlap seems
>> : jim harbaugh will come over to your home sale of anger and tell you heder at want my money and then walk out and see how you feel about it. eventually everything will work out if indeed he wants to stay. in the 40 matters what him tuesday. you have to admit the incoming policy that pays him $15 million and the management deserves a little more than just having a public spectacle which has become now. a work out if both sides want to work together and you just don't walk yoga own what everyone's the the sort of like. airline >> : called personal out as entitled time i get really mad as if somebody i love. rathei like belays i think he's trying to end as only way it used the media to delete young jet york. copper out >> : your like steve like because you're a white guy that did make the nba. >> : how did he find that out as got enough to get a scholarship to get to college or the everyone was yet losing their minds. with steve like ella's my mind over guys like car is an starting star players steve like as a nice little guy i think he is averaging about 5 points a game. it's
related to the historic impacts of jim crow and slavery. these are areas where black men started out behind and remained often behind. take unemployment. 5% for white men roughly but 12% for black men and 8% for latino men. among 16 to 24-year-olds not enrolled in school fewer than half have jobs. those are long term and persistent inequities. then he addressed a second category. systemic racism that operates today holding young men of color back even when their work or their conduct or their choices are the same as other americans. look at smoking weed for example. black and white people use pot at similar rates. black americans are three times as likely as white people to be arrested for marijuana or look at what happens when you mess around in school or cut class and get into a fight which a lot of kids do sooner or later. today they make up more than 70% of all students referred to leempt. black students are 3 1/2 times more likely to be expelled than white students. only half graduate from high school on time. after citing some of the statistics himself president obama said this
to hang out with me and jim, wonderful. i almost wouldn't want to be in their presence. don't go to the wedding, don't say congratulation. but when you run a business you're doing that in part because a web of state laws makes it possible. what about people in a bar? i assume arizona is like other states and that you just can't open up a bar. you got to get a liquor license from the state. what if there are only a limited number of establishments that serve you? what if you were in a fairly small community where there aren't a lot of florists. this is a real depravation. if you decide to open a business, given the inevitable entanglement with the state laws, maybe there's zoning, maybe you have a certain facility and somebody couldn't open up one nearby because of the zoning restrictions, it's a very real intrusion on your ability to live. and as i said, they have this dilemma, if u they don't narrow it, it's too broad. >> representative orr i want to get you in here and ask where do you think arizona should go from here? sl a there is no statewide ban. where do you think arizona
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)